HOME  > >  ARDUINO MAIN PAGE  T.O.C.     Delicious.Com Bookmark this on Delicious   StumbleUpon.ComRecommend to StumbleUpon
  (And for more Good Stuff: Arduino Programming Course and Electronics: components and principles)

Arduino "How To's", Goodies,
and Projects

Looking for write-ups of how to do specific things with an Arduino? Looking for information on things you might connect to your Arduino? You've come to the right place!


-

New!... (well, it was, 24 Nov 15): Breadboards are great. PCBs have their place. Here's a middle ground: A "breakout board", if you like, for Arduino Pro Mini. You plug the Arduino into a socket, and all the pins become available to solder pads and, if you chose to install them, screw terminals. And there is a generous supply of pads for ancilliary components, including many connected to Vcc and Gnd. What do you think of it, please?? Cost: $8.. but minimum order is 3. You buy direct from OSH Park, I make nothing.



Before the main table of contents, few bits and pieces...

I'm in love! An "Arduino" with built in WiFi (that Just Works... no rocket science degree needed), at $15. Sparkfun ESP8266 "Thing". The ESP8266 has been around for a while... has a strong user community. Yes- you can get them cheaper. But the Sparkfun unit makes getting started SO EASY.

Brief rave: I haven't actually tried it yet, but I suspect it will be a lot of fun, and useful: If your Arduino IDE is version 1.6.7 or higher, have you noticed the new entry in "tools"? There's now a "serial plotter". A bit like the serial monitor, but this draws graphs.

The rave: I "need" (want!) one of these!! I refer to the RockBlock from rock7.com. I mean! Just the site name is reason enough? The RockBlock ($160 +tax, etc, sadly... but running costs done very sensibly and not bad!) lets you (or your device) send short messages to a central server from ANYPLACE ON EARTH! Via satellite technology. (And receive them.) And you can "drive" one with an Arduino!

Sorry. I haven't played with one. But I couldn't resist this "shout". Now for what you came here for, if your interest wasn't so casual that you couldn't "take" that little burst of excitement.

The mixed review: The Particle.io Photon: For $23, incl p&p, I fell to temptation. Not for the faint-hearted! But oh, so cool, if you like what it has. Sort of an Arduino. (You can program in "Arduino", but not by the normal Arduino IDE. You program online... yes, your code is in the cloud. Wireless connectivity. Really. Though it may not seem like it at first. IoT... it comes with some awesome Internet of Things possibilities. I finally had mine working. All I needed, I think, was my trusty (old) Android, and "home" WiFi system. A Windows XP box on the same LAN, with Firefox, was helpful. Didn't NEED more, on the XP. Resist using the "set up via USB". It is a lot of work, a lot of "stuff" you (really) may not need. Fight on with doing it wirelessly. Green flashing LED? Photon is "working"... it "just" can't connect to your WiFi. A password or permissions thing in the way. Which can be fixed via wireless, using a tablet. Probably.


This isn't only about how to do things. It also commends some good add-ons for your Arduino. The "How To's" section of this page is divided into levels according to complexity. Pages in the first (lower level) sections should be easy to read, and involve little effort or expertise. Topics which are more complex and/ or require more Arduino fluency are relegated to the higher levels.

It has to be admitted that my placement of "stuff" in "the right section" is somewhat hit and miss. I recommend using Google or your browser's "Find on this page" when you know what you are looking for. Consider this page a bit like a restaurant menu, where you can browse and be tempted?

This material assumes you have a working Arduino playing nicely with the big computer you're using to program the Arduino. If you are still getting set up, be sure to see the excellent help and troubleshooting material provided at the official Arduino site. AFTER you've looked there, you can also access the helpful forums. Alternatively, I've done a guide to setting up an Arduino. (I wrote that while I was still a raw Arduino novice, so maybe I've managed to mention some of things that more experienced Arduino hands didn't realize weren't "obvious".) I also have an extended course in Arduino programming for you, if that's what you want.




Table of Contents, Arduino "How To's":

(The "Projects" and "Boards" listings are further down this page.)



Oops. In anything below using arrays, I may have fallen for a dangerous "gotcha". I've written an article about the gotcha for you... Don't use array element, say, 4, if you declared the array with int MyArray[4].



Level Zero How To's: (Really introductory information)

"You light up my life...": Well... maybe a few LEDs anyway. Basic information about connecting LEDs to an Arduino.

"Thank you for your input...": An introduction to connecting switches and push-buttons to an Arduino. The basics.... but they'll stand you in good stead for much work.

The Big Three: Voltage/ Resistance/ Current. You can go a long way with ad hoc answers to things, but you owe it to yourself to someday master the underlying fundamentals. This page is my introduction to those basic concepts.

Switch contact bounce: A nuisance for which we sometimes have to make allowance.

Pins of the Arduino: Some reference notes about special properties, roles, of some pins you might have thought were entirely general purpose.

Someone Else's guide Almost all of the links to tutorials from this "table of contents" page in front of you go to more pages written by me. (And as such, they usually open in the same window.) I'm including this link to one of YourDuino's tutorials, though, as he has taken a fresh approach, which may appeal to some readers. (The link opens in a new window or tab... please come back here after going there!



Level 1 How To's:

A basic command skeleton: Sometimes, you've set up your Arduino to respond to some sort of input which makes a selection. Depending on the selection, the Arduino does one "trick" or another. Even with a few LEDs and push buttons, you can make the Arduino flash different patterns on the LEDs depending on what buttons are pressed. This tutorial talks some about the underlying control structure you need for this sort of program.

LCD panel: How, easily, without spending a lot of money, to connect a simple liquid crystal display panel to your Arduino, and thus provide for text or numerical output. This solution is easier to use than the "usual", "do it with software" answer. Besides saving you programming work, it also means that fewer Arduino pins are used for the display. No, you won't be able to drive a laptop screen or monitor... but you can have several lines of characters or simple graphics, easily, and cheaply.

Serial Monitor: A way to obtain text and numbers from an Arduino program, on your PC screen, without buying anything beyond the basic Arduino and installing the basic, free, Arduino development environment software.

Analog distance sensor: Interfacing an Arduino to an analog sensor. The sensor used ($26.. but see next tutorial for an alternative) measures distances (0 - 254 inches) ultrasonically. This "How To" also has general points relevant to reading any analog signal. The "How To" includes a way to make the Arduino display the analog reading on a "bar graph" of Arduino- driven LEDs.

Another analog distance sensor: An infra red sensor, less expensive, which would just "plug in" in place of the ultrasonic sensor used in the more fully explained "how to" above. Uses an IR beam, and is good for distances from about 5cm to 90cm. Will detect things from 0-5cm, but be "fooled" as to how far away they are.

Eight LEDs, eight digital inputs: Sometimes Simple is Good. If you want a well made, neat "answer" to hooking up 8 LEDs and 8 digital inputs, see my notes about adapting the ArduCapSense shield. You'll pay a little for the luxury of doing it the easy way... but how much is your time worth? Kit: only $15 including p&p (USA) at 3/11.




Please consider Flattr? It makes it easy to make small gifts to people who have put useful things on the web. Even if you don't want to $end thank$ to me, at least check out my introduction to the new micro-donations system Flattr.htm?....

Level 2 How To's:

Dealing with individual "bits" (binary digits): A more elegant way to do something which crops up in several of my tutorials.

Control VGA display with single serial line: Inexpensive (£25 @11/14, incl p&p in UK) small board which can generate an image on a VGA display. Character based, 50 lines of 100 characters. You only use a single I/O bit of the device controlling the display, e.g. Arduino, to "say" what you want shown on the display. It can have multiple windows, and each scrolls and line-wraps automatically. In multiple colors.

Seven segment LED display: Four characters. Inexpensive ($13 @8/10, + p&p) module from Sparkfun (COM-09764)... Controlled over a simple serial link. One one digital I/O line is used. (The 09765, 09766 and 09767 are similar devices in other colors.)

Door monitor... and so much more: Ostensibly, this is about making a monitor to see that something stays in one place, be it a door, a valuable small sculpture, a child. However, the "how to" essay delivers a major, stand alone, tutorial about "top down design/ bottom up development", using sub-routines, something approximating a state diagram, and doing switch de-bounce in software. Highly recommended, if you want some lessons in how to work more productively.

Sending floating point numbers to the serial stream, and a quirk of Serial.print: How to "print" a type-double value. The "quirk" is actually a helpful feature... but it is also a trap for the unwary. Overloading. Does "Serial.print(65)" give you 65 or A? Depends on how you pass the 65 to Serial.print! But you can have the behavior you want!

Working with Binary Numbers Mostly the general theory. "Boring", but you could find concepts in the essay useful!

Radio control hobbyist servos: No "How To" for these (yet!), but I had to say something about them, having finally put my toe in that water. How easy! What fun! All of the following is about using them the simple way. You can, of course, overcome the limits implied if you "get fancy". They aren't very strong, but are capable of lots of things. With the usually-present "Servo" library, programming is very, very easy. You don't have to master "PWM"... the library takes care of that detail. You won't be using a radio link, just driving them directly over wires. Two small servos can "hang" directly off your Arduino, if you aren't putting a lot of other power demands on it. The servo will turn to (and stay at) whatever position you require over a 180° arc. (It can't "turn all the way... think of how your head works on your neck. Servos are like that, not like the mythical owl who can twist and twist.) I was tempted into buying a cheap, toy, pan & tilt head, and it is what I paid for... but still "works" enough to have fun with! Sun trackers, movable CCTV... here I come! Wish I hadn't put it off so long! See the main Arduino pages and GeekLord's Instructable for more information.

Voice synthesis: Tremendous fun! Easy. Inexpensive ($25 @8/10, + p&p)... Control a speech synthesis chip over a simple serial link. Phoneme based: "say" whatever you want to... over a speaker, or down a phone line... etc! Lots of fun possibilities. It can either be a "printer" (outputting speech) connected to your Arduino, or filled with phrases and then operated independently.

Non-blocking way to monitor the state of an input: If you don't already know about switch "bounce", or "chatter", see the simpler tutorial explaining How to read a switch, even if it "bounces".

Playing with WS2812 smart LEDs: In some ways, this isn't a "level 2" tutorial... but if you can get past the installing of a library, you will find that you can have a lot of fun with a pretty, not expensive, module with 16 very bright LED modules... and each module has a red and a green and a blue LED, and you can turn each fully on or fully off, or any of 253 brightness levels in between. And because of the way the modules work, it is all much easier than it sounds!




The globe on the right helps me see if doing these pages is worth the time it takes. It is interactive; play with it, if you wish. (You need to use your browser's "back" button to get back here after doing so.) The only information the system records is when visitors access the site, and where their ISP connected them to the internet. (In my case, that is 60 miles from where I live, at the moment.)

This comes to me as a free service from Revolvermaps.com. If you know how to insert HTML into your own web pages, it is easily added.


Level 3 How To's:

The Atmega's built in counter Want to count the number of "ons" (positive edges) in a stream of pulses? Even an erratic stream. (Or is the number of offs? Almost the same thing.) Without tedious polling- by- software? Use the built in counter! Here's how... and no, you don't need to use an interrupt, or do anything "weird" or potentially system "breaking".

Level shifting Using a transistor to "connect" an Arduino (or other microprocessor) to a 12v (DC) input. "Connecting" an Arduino to something that runs on 12v to turn that thing on and off. All without frying your Arduino.

1.8" TFT display- text and color graphics Inexpensive ($20) backlit display, easily driven.

Simple device ($10) to read barometric pressure and temperature. A crude tutorial at this point, but the Sparkfun BMP180 is a great little device. You will need... willingness to use a library (help will be given), willingness to use I22C, a source of 3.3 volts... but a 5v Arduino is okay for the silicon brains to access this sensor. Sufficiently sensitive to notice a change in altitude of just a few feet! Simply from the different air pressure.

LCD and Input buttons Details of a nice little module which lets you easily add a small LCD screen (pretty, and backlit) and 5 input buttons to any project. (US and UK suppliers. $12, December 2014.) (Ties up 7 digital lines, one analog input. Easy programming.)

$5 Liquid Crystal Display, four lines, 16 characters: Get one (or two!) while they are cheap! ModernDevice were selling for $5, excl p&p, (August 2015) some little LCDs which Just Work, without any special adaptations, with the instructions at the Arduino.cc Guide to LCDs. Pinout/ hookup is the same. Software needs no tweaks. No backlight. What do you want for $5?! It is a DataVision 16400. Read the page this links to, if you want your hand held, and every detail explicit.

Reading an IR remote control / "Beam broken" intruder, etc, detectors: Use an ordinary remote control as a keyboard for all your Arduino projects. In some digressions at the end of the tutorial, I present some project ideas. Have fun! (If you use the library recommended, you can also send IR remote control signals from an Arduino.) The "beam broken" detector does not need a remote control handset, but if you read the tutorial, you'll see how the topics are related.

RFID reader A simple guide to connecting an RFID reader to your Arduino. It is specific to the Innovations ID-20 ($35, 2/11) from Sparkfun.com, but should also be almost everything you need for the slightly less expensive ($30, 2/11) ID-12.

Drive a four coil stepper motor. These little motors are easy to obtain... I got one for 5v, with a driver board, for about $5, from an established US distributor. There's a one minute YouTube video showing my four coil stepper motor in action, if you want that. It is running the program discussed here, through the driver board discussed here.

Know the date and time of day Using a DS1302 RTC chip. This "tutorial" is not yet polished, but has useful information. I bought the hardware for $2 (+ the price of a "button cell". Does NOT require you to put something on the I2C channel.

Sense humidity and temperature Using DHT22, SHT11, RHT02, and similar chips. I bought the hardware for about $10 + p&p from a "mainstream", US based supplier. This tutorial is in my NoviceGuard daughter boards series, but you don't need NoviceGuard or the NovGrdCore library to use it. You make just two minor changes to the software to adapt for general use.

Eight capacitive input pads, eight LEDs... plus audio! The ArduCapSense shield gives you eight "pads" on a nicely made shield... which can also be used with Arduino clones which do not accept shields directly, due to their footprint. As a bonus, it also carries 8 LEDs, and a simple circuit to interface a digital output to an audio amplifier and speaker. Only $15 as kit with parts, 3/11.

Subroutine to measure frequency This slightly atypical tutorial presents a subroutine which will look at an input, and tell you if a pulse train is present, i.e. a signal going "on"/ "off"/ "on"/ "off"/ "on"/ "off... fairly steadily... or not. It doesn't use interrupts. It will return, even if there is no pulse train. Actually, it returns the length of a full cycle, but that's inversely proportional to the frequency, isn't it? Developed in connection with the DirtCheapDumbWireless project.

nuElectronics Datalogging Shield... How to use the £11, c. $16 (7/10), shield for data logging from www.nuelectronics.com... and why you would want to! (Sadly, they seem to have Gone Away... but their products may be available in the second hand market... and numerous general points are addressed.)

Sadly no longer available: 1-Wire interface... How to use a $8 pre-programmed microcontroller to greatly simplify communications with the wonderful 1-Wire family of sensors and actuators. The product at the heart of this page is no longer available. I had some initially- promising discussions with people who might be able to get it back on the market. Let me know of any (no-commitment) interest (semi-serious, at least), and I could try again. Or the description on the page could inspire you (if not you, who? If not now, when?) to make a replacement for this wonderful device!) My page about the interface was heavily re-written in the first part of April 2008. Not only could it be of interest for the stated topic, but also it exemplifies communicating between and Arduino and serial devices in general. The Dallas 1-Wire family of chips open up all sorts of possibilities, including MicroLans. Read about connecting them. The discussion also speaks of the Arduino's 1-Wire Library... a different way to connect to 1-Wire devices. ("SPI" is not covered here.)


Level 4 How To's:

I have a number of pages which talk about connecting Arduinos to other instances of silicon intelligence. The first link takes you to a sub-menu of "illustrative" programs, demonstrating general principles. The other links (more to come) are to pages which discuss specific, "worthwhile in their own right" projects.

Using the If This Then That service for the first time The free service at ifttt.com is way too cool. Also one of those things with so many possibilities that it is hard to know where to start. This tutorial shows you how, from scratch, to use a web-enabled Arduino (an ESP8266 works especially well) to cause an email (or SMS) to be sent to whomever you wish when something happens at the Arduino. For the demo, you simply pull D4 to ground to trigger the sending of the email... but changing the "something" would be child's play. The Really Useful Stuff in the tutorial is how to get started with IfThisThenThat.

Good news! If you've done the tutorial above, you get a double reward. The bad news is that the tutorial this takes you to really needs for you to do previous first. This tutorial tells you how to send a "do it" command to an internet connected device as the "That" of a "If this then that" recipe. And it is EASY... after you've done what's in the tutorial above with its "getting started with IfTTT" exercises.

Linking Arduinos to things with serial ports A sub menu setting the stage for several tutorials, including How to speak to PC from Arduino, and How to speak to Arduino from PC.

One device which use a serial connection, but which is a simpler instances of that kind of thing is...

Connect a USB keyboard to a microprocessor: Inexpensive (£14 @12/14, inc tax, but plus p&p) small board to take an ordinary USB keyboard and convert keypresses to a stream of serial data for, say, and Arduino, Teensy, or other microprocessor. Ties up just one pin of the microprocessor and very limited memory, etc, resources.

Moving on to other "linking" discussions...

Linking multiple devices Arduino "master/slave" setup: With a program running in a "master" PC, an Arduino "slave", with an LED and "doorbell" switch can be "driven" / monitored. The window on the PC's screen tells you from moment to moment whether the "doorbell" connected to the Arduino is pressed, and there are two buttons: "Turn LED On", "Turn LED Off". With a click of the mouse on the master, the PC, the LED on the Arduino can be turned on or off. The two are connected by a simple serial link. You don't NEED Delphi to benefit from the material in the tutorial, even though the PC part of it is couched in Delphi terms.

Linking multiple devices Arduino "client/server" setups. Using a serial link to another device.


Level 5 How To's:

Most of these are probably best accessed through the explanation and menu at ArduServer.com. If you find errors in the "Also at/ Not at.. ArduServer.com" info, please write to me and "complain", citing "ahttoc.htm"?

Web server 2 A guide to connecting your Arduino as a web server to the world! with a Wiznet W5100 interface... the widely supported one. There are links from there to Arduino servers which you can play with across the net. (To set up your own, you do not need a "static IP address", if you know what that is, and it is worrying you.) With the web server described, you can supply a Xively (previously Pachube) or ThingSpeak data stream source. (This is covered in the ArduServer.com top level page. (I haven't "played with" this since before Pachube was absorbed into Xively.))

ArduWatcher Once you have an Arduserver with sensors on your LAN, or the internet, if it creates a specific line in the page of HTML it returns, then you can set ArduWatcher running in a Windows PC somewhere... elsewhere on LAN, or, if Arduserver is visible to the internet, anywhere on the internet, and (automatically) periodically visit the Arduserver, harvest the current sensor readings, and save them in a CSV file for use anywhere you want to use them.

Web server.. the original Another guide to connecting your Arduino as a web server, similar to the one above. This uses an ENC28J60 interface... the old, inexpensive, less widely supported one. Cost of project: About $40, including an Arduino clone to be dedicated as the server. ($40 on top of things which I imagine you already have.) This can also serve Pachube or ThingSpeak. (This is covered in the ArduServer.com top level page.)

PCSensor.com TEMPerLAN This "tutorial/ how to" is very atypical. At the moment, the link takes you to something which at first doesn't seem to have anything to do with Arduino work, and in fact the first part of the page doesn't have anything to do with the thing related to Arduino work! But if you scroll down, you will find anguished rambles regarding my experiences with the TEMPerLAN... a neat little device, which does seem to work(!), but which at 9/11 is, my view, let down by limited documentation and software.

But! Follow the links, and my software for the TEMPerLAN will also allow you to access my ArduSimpLan, subject of the next tutorial. So... if you are interested in the programming of a client, to run on a PC, to talk to an Arduino simple (not html) server, you may still find it worth reading through the TEMPerLAN material! (TEMPerLAN is not covered in the ArduServer.com top level page.)

ArduSimpSrv A simple Arduino Server. Not all servers are web servers! This tutorial explores an alternative. The good news: Your Arduino won't have to dish up HTML, so the complexities of that are avoided... leaving room for doing more.

The bad news? You'll need a dedicated client program to read what the server makes available. One is provided for Windows users, and instructions for writing your own, too.

An ArduSimpLan can be accessed from anywhere on the internet, if you configure your LAN as needed. (The configuration for that is a general matter of LAN admin, regardless of whether it is a ArduSimpSrv you are making available, or something else. The details are covered at my FarWatch pages... but you don't have to set up the Apache server, or have an always-on PC... the ArduSimpSrv will be the always-on server. (Oh! You will need an always on PC to take care of keeping your DynamicDNS service informed of your changing IP address, unless, as may well be the case, your router or an IPCam on your network can take care of that. Sigh.) (ArduSimpSrv is covered in the ArduServer.com top level page.)



Projects

(The "How To's" section is further up this page. The "Boards" section is further down this page.)


Projects: essays on specific Arduino driven systems...





Please consider Flattr? It makes it easy to make small gifts to people who have put useful things on the web. Even if you don't want to $end thank$ to me, at least check out my introduction to the new micro-donations system Flattr.htm?....

Perpetual Motion: Use an Arduino, a magnet, an electromagnet and two switches to create a pendulum which never stops gently swinging. Count the swings if you want to know the time of day, but created for the fun and aesthetics of it. (Comes with complete program code.)

Burglar Alarm: At the moment, that link takes you just to some Arduino sourcecode. I will write one of my tutorials for you in due course. (A draft is well along.)

Access Control: A simple little thing. But completely secure and useable... just not very big! Might be worth looking at, just for general ideas in it, even if you don't need an electronic lock. Easily adapted to add features.

Access Control: A huge essay, lots of tutorial material, fancy "electronic lock", driven by an Arduino. (A case study from my Arduino Course).

Light to lighten... the hallway: There's nothing particularly difficult in this project. At it's heart: A simple system to turn on a light in a dark hallway when appropriate. It turns itself off after a suitable period... and lots of other things happen. I was inspired by the UK's Computer Shopper. It isn't particularly well polished, but even if you don't want a hallway light, I think it has some useful guidance on good programming and project development. I hope you will at least scan it, for those elements.

Software to run a loom: Ironic, really. Any computer studies course claims that a loom was the first programmable device. (It was "programmed" with punched cards. Change the cards, and you would weave a different fabric. Now, 2015, we come full circle: A program to control a loom. This was the fruits of an actual "job" to create a real program for a real loom. The write up has rough edges, but it takes you through what the program does, and how it might be adapted for different requirements. The program is in good shape, and illustrates some Best Practice ways of doing things. What this does not have is a lot of tutorial material.

The "BreakWire LAN": This essay doesn't tell you "all about how to do it", but it does present some of the basics for creating a little LAN that would allow you to connect Arduinos to one another, to "talk" on a LAN. A "big" PC could be on the LAN, too.

Lidar scanner: Have you heard about lidar scanners? Quite cool, not too expensive. My introduction to lidar scanners page doesn't go into detail, but may whet your appetite to spend $90 to try one. You can map your vicinity with one, or "see" changes in a vicinity, if you've taken a baseline. You could also use the device to "capture" 3D surfaces.

Color-aware line follower: Ever been in a huge public building, say a hospital, where the administration has put colored lines on the wall to help you navigate? "Follow the red line for emergency exit", "follow the green line for cafeteria", "blue line for billing", etc? Someone must have thought of the following project already, but I haven't seen it elsewhere before 2 May 2011, and still not at 15 September 2011. But it would be a fun project for you. (I haven't built one, just dreamed it up.) For many years, "line following" robots have been around. This idea extends that a little. The robot would operate in an arena with a white floor and SEVERAL lines on it... in different colors. Near the edge of the arena, a black line all around it, like a "fence". The robot would follow the line of the color you tell it to. If you tell it to change to a different color, it should be able to seek the line out, turning back whenever it reaches the "fence", rather than going off the edge of "the world." The Sparkfun Color Light Sensor - Avago ADJD-S311-CR999 ($5 at 5/11) is a very clever sensor for this. BEWARE, however... It is a 3.3v device. The programming to read from it is not trivial. And this thing is TINY, and you'll need some very tricky soldering, and a PCB, if you buy just the sensor. Happily, Sparkfun offers one on a breakout board! ($15 at 9/11 + p&p). (One of you, Gentle Readers, should make a present of one to me, and remove the temptation I am feeling. Until just now, this paragraph talked about "it would be nice if Sparkfun put the sensor on a breakout board". I only went off to the site, and into temptation's way, to keep this page current for you!!). If you can't face the fancy programming, or the 3V3 requirement, how about interfacing your Arduino to three AmbiLight sensors, with color filters, anyone? Or one plus a filter changer? (If you undertake this with a mere phototransistor, be sure to use one with a good response to a wide band of frequencies. Many are almost color blind, "seeing" just one color.) (Of course, the Arduino Uno has a 3V3 output, and you'll need another Arduino to drive the sensor, anyway, so what better excuse to buy an Uno, in the same order as the sensor on the board?? (Uno: $30, including onboard serial-to-USB i/f.)






Boards- details of some clones and different form factors

(The "How To's" and "Projects" sections are further up this page.)


Boards: essays on specific Arduinos and clones...


Bean+: ("Bean Plus"), from PunchThrough.com A physically small, lipo powered, Bluetooth equiped Arduino clone with some further extra bits. Nice little beast.

Qduino: A physically small, breadboard friendly Arduino clone with special features making it lipo battery friendly.

Other Stuff

(Miscellaneous things that didn't fit in the more organized part of the page, above here.)


Arduino Simulator available!

Stan Simmons' free simulator of Arduino Uno for Windows works! Hurrah! Great for getting a taste, great for demos in schools.


Established Arduino Users...

Help "show the world" how widely adopted the Arduino is! See note below about ArduMap... a place where you can say "Arduino Spoken Here".


Make PCBs, at a hobbyist level...

PCB Design for Arduinos: I like KiCad for PCB design. This link will take you to some .lib and .mod files for putting Arduinos on PCBs.


Using Dallas Semiconductor 1-Wire chips...

My tutorials about programming for the Dallas Semiconductor 1-Wire (tm) chips, as used on a MicroLan (tm), have been moved to here.. Those tutorials are written for Delphi (language) programmers, but they contain much information that would apply to other language environments. I also maintain pages which introduce MicroLans and explain the hardware.




The Arduino programming course from Sheepdog Guides...

Further to the Arduino ideas the page you are reading now will take you to, I have posted a series of essays which try to help you become a better Arduino programmer and engineer... but, for the best result, you will have to buckle down and work your way through them in sequence. The "How To's" here can be accessed in whatever order you like.

My experience is with the Arduino Diecimila and two clones, the The Bare-Bones Board ("BBB") from ModernDevice.com and the Boarduino from AdaFruit. I've been using the Arduino Development Tool (IDE- Integrated Development Environment), on a Windows XP box since version 0010. (I'm using 0014 for some work at the moment.) Having said all that, I have confidence that the product works well across various platforms. I am beginning to use Linux, although so far I've only done a little Arduino work there (using Ubuntu).


Feel free to use this information in programming courses, etc, but a credit of the source would be appreciated. If you simply copy the pages to other web pages you will do your readers a disservice: Your copies won't stay current. Far better to link to these pages, and then your readers see up-to-date versions. For those who care- thank you- I have posted a page with more information on what copyright waivers I extend, and suggestions for those who wish to put this material on CDs, etc.




Other Arduino Resources...

There are many! That is part of the reason I am so enthusiastic about the device.

Suppliers: I like Sparkfun, ModernDevice and Wulfden, all in the US. There are other good ones, they're just the one I happen to use. (I came across Emartee in September 2011. While I haven't used them yet, they seemed to have some good stuff. There are other people who sell primarily via eBay. You have to remember that there are many Arduino-friendly devices which are not only good with Arduinos.

Sparkfun in particular has both a good user forum and a means of adding comments and discussion to each product's page. Of course, as Arduino is such a good fit with 1-Wire, my preferred 1-Wire suppliers are also, by association, "Arduino suppliers".

If you like the sort of little "How To's" this page is index to, or if you want to buy some useful kits of things that interface with Arduinos, you could do worse than to visit Peter Anderson's Arduino page. He was a university lecturer whose involvement with hobbyist electronics goes back (like me) to the "parallel port is cool" age. It was an off-hand "this might be fun" remark by him about the Arduino, which he was just starting with at the time, which got me into Arduinos, for which I thank him... I think. (My Arduino play hasn't helped progress on the things I "ought" to be spending time on. Sigh.)

Sadly, Peter passed away a few years ago, and only some of his kits remain available (elsewhere), but any of his notes which you can still find are good, with notes on hardware and Arduino code for the following, and probably more. The list below was harvested and edited in September 2011. Check "the horse's mouth" for current offerings.

(The last item, the Melexis, is a neat little device which can tell the temperature of something from a distance, from the IR radiation it is giving off. Cost: About $17. Slow scan infra-red cameras, anyone?)

If you dig around his site, you'll find other goodies, too.

Moving on to other Arduino suppliers...

In October 2014, I had excellent service in the UK from Hobbytronics.co.uk, having had excellent service previously in September 2011 when I ordered an Ethernet Pro (they were out of stock at that time in several places). Hobbytronics makes online ordering painless. You can pay by credit card, debit card, PayPal. I ordered mid-morning Saturday, goods arrived Monday! (I hadn't paid for expedited shipping.)

The YourDuino shop has sundry bits and pieces, either nicely mounted on modular carrier boards, or as raw components. (They also sell Arduinos and clones. And they have some tutorials which avoid being "heavy").

In Australia... and all of these people will ship, and for electronic parts, international mail can be very good... there is http://www.freetronics.com/. I haven't (yet!) used them myself, but their site is well worth a visit, at least.

Even if you don't end up buying from them, pay a visit to the good people at Cooltronics in the UK. They have outstanding product description pages, for instance the one for the Arduino Ethernet. That page gives you better technical information that the official Arduino site, last time I looked! (The Arduino Ethernet, by the way, is available with or without the PoE module.)




Plug for ArduMap. Mention of Google Maps' "Arduino Users Map".

On July 8th, 2012, if you went to ArduMap (http://www.guglio.net/ArduMAP) you might think there are two Arduino enthusiasts in the UK, five in the US. Not so! (Go along to the Sparkfun forum, if you don't believe me.)

Now... I would be the first to caution giving away personal information online, but I've had my "details" listed at ArduMap for many months now... no regrets.

ArduMap is a fun idea, creating a map of the world with flags for the general location of participating Arduino enthusiasts.

(Details for anyone who decides to go ahead...)

ArduMAP: Yes, you do have to register... so that you can be "given" a flag that you control! Allows fine tuning, e.g. the British person who is, geographically, in the US can have a British flag. The registration process asks for your Arduino forum user id. This is a four digit number which you will find in the URL if you go to your forum profile page.

There's another user map at maps.google.com, called "Arduino User Map", created by Arduino forum users Mowcius", and I think that's his Google ID, too.

I've used the Google "make your own map" in the past... have some idea of what i am doing, but was totally unable to put a pin for myself on the map without linking that pin to everything else I do in every corner of Google. And remember: Google is constantly growing. Your "private" account over at SomeObscureForum.com might today be a safe place to discuss details of collecting the kids after practice with the other soccer moms... but when Google buys the site...? The introductory video... why can't I just get some text to read?... about why maps you make yourself on the Google Maps site is presented by a pretty young thing that wants to tell the world her favorite bike trails in the backwoods of Colorado. Excuse me? I hope she's lying, lives in Brazil, and never goes near a bike... but if so, I am disappointed in Google.

Back to the pros and cons of using the Google Arduino map: It would appear that anyone logged in with a Google ID can move any flag! (And if you aren't logged in, it would seem that seeing the map at all is hard.) But, as I say, I backed away from that map pretty quickly, on Identity Leak concerns. (Leave a $5 bill on the sidewalk, and sure, someone will steal it. Identity "theft" is not always hard, when people are careless. The Great Phone Hacking Scandal in Britain was wrong, but what the bad people did was hardly what I would flatter with the name "phone hacking".)

Before I backed out, I was in a strange situation where it seemed I couldn't remove the pin I'd placed for myself... but that may have been AKC syndrome. (Ante- Keyboard- Clot). One or the other of the above may explain why some user's pins are in the middle of oceans.

One way to get there... I think... is via....https://maps.google.com/maps/ms?ie=UTF&msa=0&msid=106367500863692290311.00048bf511125d88d5fc7. Whether that will work may depend on whether you are logged into Google.




Please Humor me? (Unrelated to Arduino)

Take a moment to visit my http://Flat-Earth-Academy.com? It aims to help kids (or adults who missed out in school!) interested in science know what the questions are, to attain a "basic framework" of knowledge on which they can build a good understanding. No "sugar coatings"... just some concentrated Good For You stuff. There must be SOME people left who aren't afraid to "work" their way to the expansion of their knowledge? Mention it in any relevant forum you visit, please? (Opens in new tab or window, so you can get back here just by closing it.))





Editorial Philosophy

See the discussion near the bottom of the "top level" page covering the bulk of my Arduino contributions. There is information there, too, about things like "May I copy your material?", and the system of file names I am trying to work to.




   Search this site or the web        powered by FreeFind
 
  Site search Web search
Site Map    What's New    Search

The search engine is not intelligent. It merely seeks the words you specify. It will not do anything sensible with "What does the 'could not compile' error mean?" It will just return references to pages with "what", "does", "could", "not".... etc.
In addition to the How To articles for which this page serves as Table of Contents, I have other sites with material you might find useful.....

Tutorials about the free database which is part of the free Open Office.
Sequenced set of tutorials on Pascal programming and electronics interfacing.
Some pages for programmers.
Using the parallel port of a Windows computer.


If you visit 1&1's site from here, it helps me. They host my website, and I wouldn't put this link up for them if I wasn't happy with their service... although I was less than pleased the other day to have what I was doing interrupted by a telephone call from their sales team, trying to get me to extend my involvement. Sigh. Hardly a rare event, but I'd thought 1&1 were a bit classier that some of the people who have my telephone number.



Ad from page's editor: Yes.. I do enjoy compiling these things for you... hope they are helpful. However.. this doesn't pay my bills!!! If you find this stuff useful, (and you run an MS-DOS or Windows PC) please visit my freeware and shareware page, download something, and circulate it for me? Links on your page to this page would also be appreciated!

Click here to visit editor's Sheepdog Software (tm) freeware, shareware pages.


And if you liked that, or want different things, here are some more pages from the editor of these tutorials....

Click here to visit the homepage of my biggest site.

Click here to visit the homepage of Sheepdogsoftware.co.uk. Apologies if the "?FrmAht" I added to that link causes your browser problems. Please let me know, if so?

Click here to visit editor's pages about using computers in Sensing and Control, e.g. weather logging.



To email this page's editor, Tom Boyd.... Editor's email address. Suggestions welcomed!


Valid HTML 4.01 Transitional Page tested for compliance with INDUSTRY (not MS-only) standards, using the free, publicly accessible validator at validator.w3.org


Why does this page cause a script to run? Because of the Google panels, and the code for the search button. Why do I mention the script? Be sure you know all you need to about spyware.

....... P a g e . . . E n d s .....